Archive for November 27th, 2007

More on Mandates: Ezra’s Take

November 27, 2007

Is Obama’s decision not to include mandates for health coverage “a policy … his campaign regards as a mistake”? Ezra Klein believes so. Maybe he has some insider info that’s not available to the rest of us. But even if the Obama campaign thinks it’s a mistake, I don’t.

Ezra’s piece is an emphatic and succinct summary of the pro-mandate arguments being made from the left by a number of progressive Democratic health policy analysts. Ezra writes:

I’m getting really tired of Obama’s constant excuse that his health care plan isn’t universal because “The reason Americans don’t have health insurance isn’t because they don’t want it, it’s because they can’t afford it.” The reason Americans don’t all have flat screen televisions is because they can’t afford those, too.

That’s true, I suppose – although I’d hesitate to use an analogy between healthcare and expensive consumer electronics when critiquing a policy from the left. But we’re not mandating televisions. And the mandate we are discussing won’t achieve its stated goal of “universal coverage.”

Most experts agree that compliance with a health mandate will be notably less than universal. It will be greater under the Clinton plan than it would be under Obama’s mandate-free alternative. But we’re talking about relative degrees of coverage, not the “universality” that will remain somewhat elusive even under mandates.

We share similar concerns about each of the Democratic candidates, but Ezra specifically sees Obama’s no-mandate position as a betrayal of progressive principles. He writes of his hopes, now unrealized, that Obama would argue “we as a society needed to unify, come together, make temporary sacrifices to build a better world.” Ezra adds, “his remarkable eloquence rendered him uniquely able to articulate the larger progressive narrative, that our nation must move forward as ‘we,’ rather than continue as a country of I’s.”

Here’s my response: First, when it comes to universal coverage and mandates it’s not a black-and-white matter of “we” vs. “I.” Mandates add some more”I’s” into the “we” pile, but not all of us. How many? That remains to be seen. Massachusetts residents will have to choose between expensive health insurance or a tax penalty that starts at less than $300 but quickly escalates to half their expected premium. Many will buy the insurance, but others will take the penalty.

As Massachusetts “Connector” Authority chief Jon Kingsdale said, “There’s good evidence, whether it’s buying auto insurance or wearing seat belts or motorcycle helmets, that mandates don’t work 100%.”

Read the rest of this entry »